While understanding existing code during software development or reverse engineering, it is quite useful to be able to quickly see other instances of the same variable or function in the current code view. To enable this feature in Ghidra, I suggest you perform the following two configuration changes: Under "Edit" → "Tool Options..." 1. select "Listing Fields" → "Cursor Text Highlight" in the tree view on the left and change "Mouse Button To Activate" to "LEFT" 2. select "Key Bindings" in the tree view on the left and assign a key you can easily press to "Highlight Defined Use" ("SPACE" for example) Happy understanding! Update (2019-11-22): Actually "Highlight Defined Use" refered to in item 2. of the above list is not the same as the highlighted parts from item 1 :sadkeanu:.


This post is written for aspiring reverse engineers and will talk about a technique called _API hashing_. The technique is used by malware authors to hinder reverse engineering. We will first discuss the reasons a malware author may even consider using API hashing. Then we will cover the necessary technical details around resolving dynamic imports at load-time and at runtime and finally, will described API hashing and show a Python script that emulates the hashing method used in Sodinokibi/REvil ransomware. Read on


It's 2019. People get paid for playing Starcraft. As someone who does not, I'm trying to get into watching the games by following the currently held World Championship Series 2019 in Starcraft 2. Even after 20 years I think Starcraft has lost nothing of its fascination. I'm enjoying watching the game now as much as I enjoyed playing it when it was first released. Read on


Earlier this year, I was thrilled to hear that my submission for a talk at this year's [FrOSCon](https://www.froscon.de/) (Free and Open Source Software Conference) was accepted. [The talk](https://programm.froscon.de/2019/events/2350.html) is about Ghidra, the reverse engineering tool which was recently release into open source by the NSA. Since I expected a very heterogeneous audience with people from all kinds of industries with all kinds of backgrounds, I decided to give a long introduction with a lot of motivation for reverse engineering and only use the last quarter or so of the talk to actually show Ghidra's capabilities. You can find the [slides here](https://blag.nullteilerfrei.de/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/FrOSConTalk2019-Ghidra.pdf), the source [of the slides on github](https://github.com/larsborn/FrOSCon2019-Ghidra-Talk) and a recording at [media.ccc](https://media.ccc.de/v/froscon2019-2350-ghidra_-_an_open_source_reverse_engineering_tool). Based on feedback after and during the talk, I added a bullet point under Motivation: a lot of people at FrOSCon seemed to be in the position where a wild binary blob appeared and they had to deal with it. Some because they found an old service running with source code not available (or readable) anymore and some because they want to re-implement a protocol that is not documented.


A while back [I blawgd about how to get the MSDN library for offline use](https://blag.nullteilerfrei.de/2017/12/21/get-the-msdn-library-for-offline-use/). However, the Help Viewer has its problems. I won't list all of its problems, but it was certainly a bad candidate to integrate Win32 API documentation support to Ghidra. There is [a pretty neat project by Laurence Jackson](http://laurencejackson.com/win32/), but I think I just found something a little better even: Microsoft provides [a download of the MSDN Library for Visual Studio 2008 SP1, stand-alone, offline, as an ISO](https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?displaylang=en&id=20955) - smell this, Help Viewer: So this is nice, but the main point of this exercise was to integrate this into Ghidra. If that's something you care about, read on.


After a system crash, Ghidra greeted me with the message
Unsupported file system schema: idata
when I tried to open the project. Click here to see what happened next!


Say you want to write a C program, but you want to avoid including plain strings within the binary. This is something often done by malware authors, for example, to avoid easy extraction of so called indicators of compromise. I can also imagine a legitimate business that uses string obfuscation to make reverse engineering of their software harder to protect their intellectual property. This is often called string obfuscation. I want to use this knowledge to make the world a better place!


Do you ... analyze a lot of malware? Dynamically, too? Or do you just want to launch suspended processes? Well either way, although this is really easy to do, my intense web research did not yield satisfactory results. So here you go, this will just take the entire command line that is passed to it and execute it as a new, suspended process:
#include <Windows.h>
#include <Shlwapi.h>

BOOL ChrIsWhiteSpace(WCHAR x) {
    return x == 32 || (x >= 9 && x <= 13);
}

int WinMainCRTStartup() {
    int ArgCount = 0;
    WCHAR* CommandLine = GetCommandLineW();
    WCHAR** ArgList = CommandLineToArgvW(CommandLine, &ArgCount);
    if (ArgList && ArgCount > 1) {
        WCHAR* PtrRest = StrStrW(CommandLine, ArgList[1]);
        if (PtrRest) {
            STARTUPINFOW StartupInfo;
            PROCESS_INFORMATION ProcessInfo;

            while (!ChrIsWhiteSpace(*PtrRest))
                PtrRest--;

            GetStartupInfoW(&StartupInfo);

            CreateProcessW(
                NULL,
              ++PtrRest,
                NULL,
                NULL,
                FALSE,
                CREATE_SUSPENDED | INHERIT_PARENT_AFFINITY | DETACHED_PROCESS | CREATE_DEFAULT_ERROR_MODE,
                NULL,
                NULL,
                &StartupInfo,
                &ProcessInfo
            );
            CloseHandle(ProcessInfo.hProcess);
            CloseHandle(ProcessInfo.hThread);
        }
        LocalFree(ArgList);
    }
    ExitProcess(0);
}
Do you want the Base64 encoded binary?


a.k.a. "My Bank does not support CSVs". When I asked my bank for "machine readable" versions of my bank statements, they where like: WAT! Their website has a CSV-export function. But only data from the last three months can be exported. Of course, it would have been smart to have performed this export every two months or so, but let's talk about something else. Sure!


When I open up a file in IDA Pro, I usually want the HexRays decompiler panel to the right of the disassembly. It just so happens that I open up a lot of files in IDA Pro and I have to rearrange the panels every time. Now I finally sat down and wrote a little Python plugin that will rearrange the panels just the way I like them. You may have similar problems and may find it useful. You should be able (with only a small amount of pain) to modify the script according to your own preferred layout:
import idaapi

def runonce(function):
    """
    A decorator which makes a function run only once.
    """
    function._first_run = True
    def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
        if function._first_run:
            function._first_run = False
            return function(*args, **kwargs)
    return wrapper

@runonce
def position_pseudocode():
    idaapi.set_dock_pos('Pseudocode-A', None, idaapi.DP_RIGHT)
    idaapi.set_dock_pos('Graph overview', 'Output window', idaapi.DP_TAB)
    idaapi.set_dock_pos('Functions window', 'Output window', idaapi.DP_TAB)

class PseudoCodeTabRight(idaapi.plugin_t):
    flags = idaapi.PLUGIN_HIDE
    comment = 'Opens the PseudoCode tab in a spearate pane to the right.'
    help = 'The plugin triggers automatically when the decompiler is engaged for the first time.'
    wanted_name = 'PseudoCodeTabRight'
    wanted_hotkey = ''

    def init(self):
        def hexrays_event_callback(event, *args):
            if event == idaapi.hxe_open_pseudocode:
                position_pseudocode()
            return 0
        if not idaapi.install_hexrays_callback(hexrays_event_callback):
            return idaapi.PLUGIN_SKIP
        return idaapi.PLUGIN_KEEP

    def run(self, arg=0):
        pass

    def term(self):
        pass

def PLUGIN_ENTRY():
    return PseudoCodeTabRight()


I have finally solved an annoying problem with my Windows 10 setup which was sortof hard to Google, so I am sharing. For quite some time, the computer had refused to go to sleep when it was not running on battery. Instead of going to sleep when instructed to, it would simply turn off the screen and mute the volume while continuing to *actually not sleep*. Moving the mouse a tiny bit would swiftly end the charade. In a recent fit of rage I decided to inspect the event log, and behold, there were some Kernel Power events that said: > _The system is entering Away Mode._ Which is entirely _not_ what I wanted when I told it to go to sleep. However, there was no option _anywhere_ in the power settings to be found that turned off this _"Away Mode"_. Well, the option actually does exist, but for some reason it is not visible unless you set the Attributes value to 2 in the following, easily memorable registry key:
HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Power\PowerSettings\238C9FA8-0AAD-41ED-83F4-97BE242C8F20\25DFA149-5DD1-4736-B5AB-E8A37B5B8187
Armed with this registry tweak, you can go back to the _"advanced"_ power settings, aka:
rundll32 shell32.dll,Control_RunDLL PowerCfg.cpl @0,/editplan:
Navigate to Sleep and there should be an option that says Allow Away Mode Policy or something similar. And that policy should be set to no, not even when plugged in, never, just sleep, for crying out loud, why does this even exist.


As I [have hinted at before](/2017/09/20/just-some-friendly-advice/), the [PyCrypto library](https://www.dlitz.net/software/pycrypto/) [seems to be dead](https://github.com/dlitz/pycrypto/issues/173). The [PyCryptodome](https://www.pycryptodome.org/en/latest/) library is a fork that is promising because it is maintained and works in Python 3, but they have a bit of a finger-wagging attitude which sometimes means that you have to fight the library a bit:
>>> from Crypto.Cipher import ARC4
>>> cipher = ARC4.new(B'funk')
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "C:\Python37\lib\site-packages\Crypto\Cipher\ARC4.py", line 132, in new
    return ARC4Cipher(key, *args, **kwargs)
  File "C:\Python37\lib\site-packages\Crypto\Cipher\ARC4.py", line 57, in __init__
    len(key))
ValueError: Incorrect ARC4 key length (4 bytes)
>>> ARC4.key_size = range(1,257)
>>> ARC4.new(B'funk').decrypt( ARC4.new(B'funk').encrypt( B'Hello World' ))
b'Hello World'
They certainly mean well, but the library is no place to impose security standards, in my opinion. In malware research for example, we often have to verbatim copy the appalling use of certain ciphers, like ARC4 with a 4-byte key. It happens all the time! I have been particularly struggling with [the removal of the XOR cipher](https://pycryptodome.readthedocs.io/en/latest/src/vs_pycrypto.html). The XOR implementation of PyCrypto was very fast, and in this article I will both benchmark how fast exactly it was and give you a drop-in replacement which degrades gracefully based on your options. Do you want to know more?


I started to play around with ArangoDB and used Python to get some data into my first database. Long story short: if you want to set your own key for the documents, do it on the document, not on the initialization data. EDIT: this is only true for the most recent version 1.3.1 release on pypi by the time of writing1. Read the longer story!
  1. See conversation on github for details []